365 Days of Earthquakes in Canada

365 Days of Earthquakes in Canada Interactive

365 Days of Earthquakes in Canada Interactive

Living in Ottawa, I’ve only felt one at magnitude 5, but it got me thinking that we aren’t entirely stable.

This was a little personal project in using some OSS tools: Data sets from Natural Resources Canada data portal which contains GeoJSON Data embedded in custom data; OpenLayers3 (which is a rewrite of OpenLayers and not backwards compatible) . Try it out here, and grab the source on my Github. Comments and feedback and pull requests welcome.

If you are moving to OpenLayers3, the documentation is autogenerated, but the constructors aren’t really described all that well. The changes were enough to warrant a demo site and a workshop site that cover a lot of cookbook tasks. Find out more about Quakes in Canada at the NRCan quake center. If you want to do something with the datasets at Open Data, you can submit them to their App catalogue here

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Publication List Update

In the course of getting a job done, we all end up doing a bit of research. Here are some of the projects I’ve contributed to, from artificial intelligence to aircraft design, tissue simulation, human-machine interfaces and Lego Mindstorms! Feel free to check it out. Wherever possible, I’ve added the presentation versions, which are a bit more visual and a lot less text!

Displays in a vibrating environment: How NASA addressed a blurry problem

vibratingDisplay2

The effect of synchronized strobed display to reduce motion blurring readibility issues in a high vibration environment. Or more specifically, Turning a mess into less of a mess.

The stereotypes are true: the boost into space from sea level is a shaky, G-infested carnival ride with every Fourier component you care to name. NASA had a similar problem as part of its problematic Ares 1 project. Some rockets have a dominant resonance frequency in long axis that is termed ‘pogo’ (like the stick) and in human rated vehicles this means a dominant mode vibration passes to the passengers. In the case of the Ares I, this was on the order of 0.7G’s at about 12 Hertz, working out to around 5mm motion. If the computer displays the passenger is looking at do not have the same damping and resonance characteristics as their own eyes and head, motion blur in the displays will make them unreadable as simulated above.

A solution tested was to strobe the display in the same way LED-based displays are dimmed – a square wave duty cycle is applied so that the display is actually off some of time. The duty cycle is synchronized to the main vibrational component of the the pogo motion, removing the worst of the motion blur at the expense of some brightness (This simulated view assumes that brightness can be boosted somewhat to compensate).

 

Trading Brightness for clarity: effect of strobing a display in sync with a sinusoidal vibration mode

Trading Brightness for clarity: effect of strobing a display in sync with a sinusoidal vibration mode

When compensating for a single, sinusoidal mode, the loss in brightness is not that great if the duty cycle of the strobing is phase matched to a displacement peak of the motion as shown. A vibration reduction of 90% is possible with a 20% duty cycle, or 80% loss in brightness.

Read the article and see the demo video here:

http://gizmodo.com/5880850/how-nasa-solved-a-100-million-problem-for-five-bucks

Away3D Flash on Android Tablet

snowbirds sim on android tablet

I have been working with the latest builds of Away3D (v3.6) optimized for FlashPlayer 10.1 in the browser environment, and wanted to compare performance of the non-hardware accelerated version (Flash 9 software rendered) using some new tablet hadrware.

The hardware here is a Samsung Galaxy Tab running Android 2.2 and Flash 10.1. Rendering about 600 polys, non-optimized (big) textures and a big skybox at full resolution drops the framerate, but the Snowbird flight sim demo otherwise works just fine. I’ll be updating this with the hardware accelerated versions of FP and Away3D and compare the results.

Platform cross-compatibility (transparency?) sure has its strengths. nice to develop once and deploy (almost) anywhere.

FITC 2009 Speaker’s Videos

Maybe you didn’t make it to an FITC event or are wondering what the speakers have to share. Check out the full videos here for free – some incredible stuff from some amazing thinkers and doers:

fitc.ca/media